“Robot surgery” are saving men from cancer

"Robot surgery" are saving men from cancer
Medicine

There’s a patient under there somewhere: The incredible medical robots that have saved a record number of men from deadly prostate cancer.

  • £1 million Da Vinci robots have saved over 500 men with the advanced disease
  • They are used to perform life-saving surgery at University College London Hospitals
  • Procedures credited with being quicker, safer and having fewer side effects
  • Said to give precision to remove a tumour while preserving surrounding tissues
  • ‘It gives men their lives back after prostate cancer,’ reveals Professor John Kelly

Surgeons have praised the pioneering use of robots in saving a record number of men from one of the UK’s deadliest cancers.

The £1 million machines, known as Da Vinci robots, have performed life-saving surgery at University College London Hospitals on more than 500 men with advanced prostate cancer.

Surgeons credit them with being quicker, safer and the procedures have fewer side effects than existing treatments in a move that has been described as a ‘game changer’.

The robot, controlled by a surgeon at a computer console, has six arms with tiny scissors and pliers, which make incisions in the patient’s abdomen.

They are able to remove small sections of tissue and glands affected by the cancer without making a large cut, as in ‘open surgery.’

"Robot surgery" are saving men from cancer

This means the patient recovers much more quickly and can go home the next day, unlike conventional surgery, where patients can remain in hospital for five days or longer.

Furthermore, as the robot is so precise, it is less likely to damage surrounding tissue.

This means that men are are much less likely to suffer common side effects such as incontinence and impotence.

 

 

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